“An artist in her own right”

“I first read Chekhov in Russian, as a student, both short stories and the plays, but the effort to focus so hard on the original Russian, and my lack of experience in life, had left me, as a student, with a somewhat blurred vision of Chekhov himself. I rediscovered him much later, with the ease (and laziness) of reading in my own language, this time through translation. And it was a great gift: at last, through her work*, I could see clearly who Chekhov is as a writer, and why he is incomparable. It’s not really something you can explain; you read the translation, and you know.”

–Alison Anderson

*The speaker refers to translations created by Constance Garnett.

The role of the literary translator in the age of “Ferrante Fever.”

“Sometimes, I think, it’s puzzle-solving…”

“…I want to make good English sentences but without losing the particular voice of the Italian writer. I can’t explain how it happens. I think it has to do with staying pretty close to the original.”

— Ann Goldstein, head of the copy department at the New Yorker magazine, “accidental” book translator

“Her name on a book now is gold.”

— Robert Weil, editor-in-chief of Liveright

“A Book Translator Becomes A Star” by Jennifer Maloney, The Wall Street Journal, Arena, Friday, Jan. 22, 2016