On Nino’s Art, Star Wars, & the Power of Persistence

Treat yourself to the magic of Nino Chakvetadze, and have a wonderful 2018.

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“Netflix might show them (science fiction and fantasy) together, but two genres couldn’t be more different.” Is Star Wars sci-fi? Can you add fantasy elements to a sci-fi story? Figure it out with WD help. 

(While you’re at it, read this NBC News article on the same topic.)

“Remember that rejections are a badge of honor. It means you are in the game; people in the industry are reading your work. … And, most importantly, there is no such thing as overnight success. To move forward in this business (or in any business), you must constantly learn, grow, and improve. Work hard and don’t ever give up.” –Kristin Nelson, The Power of Persistence 

 

 

 

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On Author Bios, Writers of the Future, & 30 Poetry Prompts

Writing Lesson (La Leçon d'écriture)

To include, or not to include in the bio: that is the question. Find your answer in this post from Robert Lee Brewer, revisit Anne R. Allen’s post on author bios, and write a bio that will help you, and do justice to you, and your work.

Attention, new/amateur writers of sci-fi/fantasy short stories/novelettes. Ron Hubbard’s Writers & Illustrators of the Future is holding a Free Writer Contest with big prizes. Submit your work now. Deadline December 31, 2017. Don’t miss out.

Missed WD November Poem-A-Day (PAD) Chapbook Challenge? Robert Lee Brewer has collected all of his prompts for this year’s November PAD. Write your chapbook now.

 

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Writing Lesson (La Leçon d’écriture), c. 1905. Oil on canvas, Overall: 21 7/16 x 25 13/16 in. (54.5 x 65.5 cm). BF150. Public Domain.

On Longer Poems, Writer’s Mixtape, & Easy Blogging

Musician

Got a longer–min. 3 pages, max. 10 pages–poem? Consider submitting it for the Stacy Doris Memorial Poetry Award.

Check out Robert Lee Brewer’s list of 20 best songs for writers and about writing.

“…my doctor said I was going to have to choose between blogging and living to see my next birthday” — Anne R. Allen shares her own blogging ups and downs, so you may have fewer of the latter, and more of the former. Read her post on easy blogging for authors.

 

Image: Charles Demuth. Musician, 1918. Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Overall: 10 3/8 x 8 in. (26.4 x 20.3 cm). BF748. Public Domain.

On Q&A, Writing Dilemma, & Things as They Are

Elise Holland, editor of 2 Elizabeths, a short fiction and poetry publication, shares five of the most frequent questions she’s asked. See the questions, and answers.

To write or not to write by hand? Are you a laptop person, or a “fountain pen and leather-wrap journal” person? See/join a discussion.

“And when the flood waters come, and all pretenses are washed away, we’re left with how things are supposed to work, how they naturally are. And it’s a beautiful sight.”

 

 

On Lucrative Poetry, San Antonio’s 300th Birthday, & “The temptation towards resolution”

Want to start earning money writing poetry? Check out these tips from Erika Dreifus.

A cool poetry contest to honor San Antonio’s Tricentennial. Don’t miss.

“The temptation towards resolution, towards wrapping up the package, seems to me a terrible trap. Why not be more honest with the moment? The most authentic endings are the ones which are already revolving towards another beginning. That’s genius. Somebody told me once that fugue means to flee, so that Bach’s melody lines are like he’s running away.”The Art of Theater No. 12 with Sam Shepard (1943–2017)

“write from your own life”

“…make sure that there are aspects of your book that you know to the bones. Maybe there is a character inspired by your own mother. Or maybe you are a devoted baker, and your heroine is a pastry chef. It can be a place, an occupation, a way of life.

The point is this: Knowing something profoundly and deeply will free you to write about it in an engaging and authentic way, and in an original voice. Aspiring authors sometimes fear sharing the premise of their work in progress, on the grounds that somebody might “steal their idea.” I don’t think anybody should worry about this. The fact is, if you write from your own life, only you can write your book.”

—  Michele Campbell