Attn. Adventure Writers: Win £15,000

Two Sailboats at Grandcamp (Deux voiliers à Grandcamp)

  • How does a publishing deal with a writer’s advance of £15,000 sound to you?

Have you written an adventure novel exceeding 50K words? You may be the next winner of the Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing Prize.

What’s particularly good about this opportunity is that self-published novels are eligible for the Best Unpublished Manuscript Prize.

Is your manuscript too long? Janice Hardy shares advice on how to give your manuscript a necessary trimming.

Submissions are open. Read the guidelines, revise your work, and submit.

Good luck!

Image: Georges Seurat. Two Sailboats at Grandcamp (Deux voiliers à Grandcamp), c. 1885. Oil on panel, Overall: 6 1/4 x 9 13/16 in. (15.8 x 25 cm). BF1153. Public Domain.

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2019 Is Almost Here, Ready To Submit?

Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray)

  • Do you feel like poeming about teaching?

Go ahead. Write about K–12 teaching, and/or teachers, and submit your unpublished poem for a chance to win The $1,000 (!) On Teaching Poem Prize. No entry fee. Deadline: January 1st, 2019. Restrictions apply, read the guidelines carefully. Good luck!

  • Do you publish your poetry on Instagram?

Summer 2019 issue of Rattle will be dedicated to Instagram Poets. Submit your poems for a chance to be discovered, and promoted by the notable poetry magazine. You can also nominate poems written by other poets. Deadline: January 15th, 2019.

  • Have you put together your submission to Measure Review?

Guided by the editorial vision of Ashley Anna McHugh, Measure Review, an online magazine of formal poetry, will advance the legacy of Measure. Submissions will open in January, 2019. Get your unpublished sonnets, haiku, etc. ready.

Image: Paul Gauguin. Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray), 1890. Oil on canvas, Overall: 21 3/4 x 18 1/4 in. (55.2 x 46.4 cm). BF589. Public Domain.

Poetry Periodical & December Contests

Mont Sainte-Victoire (La Montagne Sainte-Victoire)

  • New Poetry Periodical!

Ugly Duckling Presse is starting a new poetry periodical.

UDP will accept up to 5 pages of poetry by December 31, for possible inclusion in the first issue, to be released in early 2019.

Submissions from new writers, translators, and people living outside the US are especially encouraged.

Read the guidelines carefully, and submit.

  • December is a great month for writing contests!

Plenty of FREE writing contests to choose from.

Again, read the guidelines carefully, and submit your work. Good luck!

Image: Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire (La Montagne Sainte-Victoire), c. 1900. Watercolor and graphite on laid paper, Overall: 12 3/8 x 19 1/8 in. (31.5 x 48.5 cm). BF652. Public Domain.

On Formal Poetry & Skin Color

In Vaudeville: Two Acrobat-Jugglers

  • Do you write formal poetry?

You might want to start putting together your submission to Measure Review.

Guided by the editorial vision of Ashley Anna McHugh, Measure Review, an online magazine of formal poetry, will advance the legacy of Measure.

So, if you happen to write a sonnet or two, don’t be in a hurry to publish them on your blog — save them until January, 2019. It’ll be here before you know it.

  • What do you write about?

Love? Life? The universe? You might be doing it all wrong. Check your skin color.

If it’s white, you should–according to Ms. Angela Pelster-Wiebe–write about white supremacy. Why? Because “those who benefit from racism (that’s you) should be on the front lines fighting it.”

Ms. Pelster-Wiebe is apparently a successful author, “a white woman writing about the toxic inheritance of white supremacy.”  Hmm..who’s benefiting from racism now?

You might want to follow in Ms. Pelster-Wiebe’s footsteps and start apologizing in writing for being born white — it’s not unlikely that you’ll achieve publication and success.

The alternative is to have respect for yourself and others, and very likely remain unpublished and unknown. (There’s always self-publishing, though.)

“…authors of all types could simply write what they would like to write because they have not contributed to white supremacy and are in no way responsible for the previous bad actions of white people to which they did not contribute.”

Now go write a love poem.

Image: Charles Demuth. In Vaudeville: Two Acrobat-Jugglers, 1916. Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Overall: 11 3/16 x 8 in. (28.4 x 20.3 cm). BF602. Public Domain.

 

 

On Taboo Words in Literature, & Trains That Glimmer

Supper Time

  • What book are you reading now?

A story I’ve read recently–“The Basement Room”–made me think that it might not be long before Graham Green is added to the growing list of racist authors.

He used the N-word! More than once!

Does it matter that it’s a fictional character that uses the word? Does it matter that it’s important to the story? Does it matter that it’s a slice of history?

Apparently, it today’s world it doesn’t.

So, hurry. Read “The Basement Room” before it’s banned.

It’s a masterful, haunting story. What a great, great writer.

  • Have you penned a story, or two?

Glimmer Train has two contests you can still submit your work to: Very Short, & Fiction OpenDeadline’s tomorrow, August 31. HURRY!

Image: Horace Pippin. Supper Time, c. 1940. Oil on burnt-wood panel, Overall: 12 x 15 1/8 in. (30.5 x 38.4 cm). BF985. Public Domain.

 

 

On Poeming Online & Submitting Published Work

Vase of Flowers (Vase de fleurs )

  • Are you looking for a friendly and supportive online community of poets?

Poetic Bloomings is “the best garden for verse”. Established in 2011, the site now reunites Marie Elena Good and Walter J Wojtanik “to help nurture and inspire the poetic spirit”.

Marie Elena and Walt are posting prompts every Sunday. Here’s the latest one.

  • Looking for a contest that accepts published poems?

Submit your work (published and unpublished) to Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest by September 30, 2018.

TOM HOWARD PRIZE: $1,500 for a poem in any style or genre
MARGARET REID PRIZE: $1,500 for a poem that rhymes or has a traditional style

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Vase of Flowers (Vase de fleurs ), c. 1889. Oil on canvas, Overall: 16 1/4 x 13 in. (41.3 x 33 cm). BF156. Public Domain.

 

 

August Submission Alerts, Don’t Miss

Lemons and Orange (Citrons et orange)

Happy August!

  • If you don’t mind $20-25 submission fees, here’s something to consider:

If you have an unpublished poetry or short story collection, and you haven’t published a full-length collection yet — submit to Black Lawrence Press for THE ST. LAWRENCE BOOK AWARD. The winner receives book publication, $1000, and 10 copies of the book. Entry Fee: $25 Deadline: August 31

Are you a writer, and a parent? The Sustainable Arts Foundation is awarding $5000 each to twenty writers and artists, who combine creative work with raising a family. It’s an opportunity for writers of creative nonfiction, fiction, graphic novels, poetry, and more. Entry Fee: $20 Deadline: August 31

  • And if you aren’t a fan of paying-to-play, here’s a free opportunity for you:

Have you published (or considered publishing) your book through Kindle Direct Publishing on Amazon.co.uk? Submit to Kindle Storyteller Award (UK). No entry fee. Prize: £20,000. Deadline: August 31, 2018.

Enjoyed the post? Like it, share it — thank you.

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Lemons and Orange (Citrons et orange), c. 1913. Oil on canvas (later mounted to fiberboard), Overall: 9 1/4

 

“Just listen, let it wash over you…”: Jeremy Irons on Narrating the Poems of T.S. Eliot

On hearing Jeremy Irons recite her late husband’s poetry, Valerie Eliot called the actor “today’s voice of Eliot.”

Jeremy Irons who recently narrated an audio book  “The Poems of T.S Eliot” talks to Stephanie Bastek of The American Scholar about the project.

  • How is driving a Lamborghini similar to understanding poetry?
  • What’s the reason Jeremy Irons listened to T.S. Eliot reading his own poetry?
  • How do you achieve a recording that’s got tremendous energy to it?

Find out. Don’t miss, it’s a delight. 

And if you are into reading poetry, rather than listening to it, here’s a different perspective on reading poetry out loud.

Finally, do you want to win a $25,800 fellowship?

  • Are you between 21 and 31 years of age?
  • Are you a US citizen, or do you reside in the US?
  • Do you write poetry?

Try your luck at Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowships. Submissions are accepted until April 30, 2018. Hurry.

Enjoyed the post? Share it, like it. Thank you.

image credit: T. S. Eliot in 1923, by Lady Ottoline Morrell, public domain

 

On Longer Poems, Writer’s Mixtape, & Easy Blogging

Musician

Got a longer–min. 3 pages, max. 10 pages–poem? Consider submitting it for the Stacy Doris Memorial Poetry Award.

Check out Robert Lee Brewer’s list of 20 best songs for writers and about writing.

“…my doctor said I was going to have to choose between blogging and living to see my next birthday” — Anne R. Allen shares her own blogging ups and downs, so you may have fewer of the latter, and more of the former. Read her post on easy blogging for authors.

 

Image: Charles Demuth. Musician, 1918. Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Overall: 10 3/8 x 8 in. (26.4 x 20.3 cm). BF748. Public Domain.

On the Size of Cameras, Rhyming Photographs, & Over 50 Years Young

“Ippawards pay tribute to the stunning imagery that can be captured with even the smallest of cameras, reminding us that the person behind the lens plays a significant part in the making of a picture.” 11th Annual iPhone Photography Awards. Open to all iPhone or iPad users worldwide. Deadline 03.31.2018. Snap, and submit.

Photographs can rhyme. See for yourself.

From Poets & Writers Magazine — “a selection of five debut authors over the age of fifty whose first books came out this past year.” Find out their names, and read excerpts from their books.