“Curious Wonder” vs. “Critical Judgement”, or Ways to Read Poetry

Reading (La Lecture)

  • Emily Dickinson is nobody’s business but my own. I will not share her with anyone. I would no more tell you about my relationship with her poems than I would tell you about a love affair. If she is yours, I hope you feel the same way.” —  from Mary Ruefle’s essay “My Emily Dickinson” quoted in The Paris Review
  • “Some are surprised that the rigorous analytical approach PG learned to apply to poetry has served him quite well in analyzing contracts and other legal documents.” — from the Passive Guy’s post on The Passive Voice blog

How do you read poetry? Do you as a reader note, for instance, prosody — the patterns of rhythm and sound? In your opinion, should poetry be analyzed? Simply enjoyed? Both? Do share in the comments.

  • Just one more thing (as Columbo would say): head over to Indies Unlimited to vote for your favorite flash fiction entry (will it be mine?). Hurry: the voting closes at 5 pm Pacific time today. Thank you.
  • For some strange technical reason when I post the link to the voting page, it doesn’t open properly: it shows the results, and doesn’t give you an option to vote. So, if you really really want to vote for your favorite entry, please go to Indies Unlimited, open the post ‘Which “Ocean of Sand” Flash Fiction Story Gets Your Vote?’, and vote from there. This should work. Thank you.

And if you enjoyed this post, press those “like” and “share” buttons. Thank you again.

Image credit: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Reading (La Lecture), c. 1891. Oil on canvas, Overall: 18 1/8 x 22 1/16 in. (46 x 56 cm). BF107. Public Domain.

 

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On $20K for a 100 Words, the Dangers of NaNoWriMo, & Nelson Algren Literary Awards

The César Egido Serrano Foundation’s V International Flash Fiction Competition’s open for submissions until “24h (Spanish peninsular time) of the International Day of the Word as a Bond of Humankind (motto of the Foundation), on November 23rd.” Can you write a 100 word story worth $20K? Yes, it’s $20,000 (!) Note: they ask for ID/Passport info on the participation form, but this is NOT a required field. Consider leaving it blank.

Is NaNoWriMo a thing for you? Does it make you happy? Or miserable? Why? To find answers to these and other questions (ex. Who are “the canaries in life’s coal mines”?) read Anne R. Allen’s latest post.

The Chicago Tribune’s Nelson Algren Literary Awards…a nationally recognized contest for original short fiction, named in honor of the Chicago literary great Nelson Algren” is open for submissions. No entry fee. Substantial prizes. Write, and submit.

On Flash Fiction, the “drifting experience” of Poetry, & Security of WordPress

The ninth annual Gemini magazine Flash Fiction Contest is accepting entries. Stories displayed on personal blogs are eligible. Low entry fee, big first prize. Deadline: Aug 31. Go for it!

“…if the poem gave her that “drifting experience,” it is doing what it is supposed to do… this experience…is precious, rare, virtually extinct even…the preservation of this drifting experience is the purpose and promise of poetry.” — Matthew Zapruder

“For a platform that powers a quarter of the websites in the world, WordPress is surprisingly insecure. The default settings leave a site open to being hacked a half-dozen different ways,” says Nate Hoffelder. Take six common sense steps to protect your site.

Indies Unlimited 2014 Flash Fiction Anthology

The Indies Unlimited 2014 Flash Fiction Anthology is available as an eBook!

Photographs by K. S. Brooks. Prompts by Stephen Hise. Authors with stories in the anthology include: Annette Rochelle Aben, Ralph L. Angelo, Jr., R.L. Austin, Laurie Boris, Melissa Bowersock, Christian A. Brown, Lynne Cantwell, A.V. Carden, Victoria A. Carr, Joan Childs, DW Davis, Leland Dirks, Jennifer Don, Ed Drury, Kathryn El-Assal, Sylvia Heike, Jamie R. Hershberger, Yvonne Hertzberger, Chris James, Howard Johnson, Vickie Johnstone, A. L. Kaplan, K.L. Kelso, L.A. Lewandowski, Angela Luo, S.A. Molteni, Kevin D. Montgomery, Arlene R. O’Neil, Sasha A. Palmer, Brenda Perlin, Sara Stark, Kathy Steinemann, Dick C. Waters, and Mandy White.