Tolerant Facebook?

Crucifixion

  • Shame on you, Facebook.

Last week, on the eve of Advent, Facebook blocked Janet Martin’s blog, and deleted all links to it she posted in her feed.

Janet is my friend. We met on poetry forums in 2011, and have been reading each other’s blogs, exchanging emails, and occasional handwritten letters ever since.

If you’ve been to Another Porch you know that Janet is a very talented poet and photographer, and about the sweetest person one can imagine.

Yet Facebook found her offensive.

  • So, what is Janet guilty of?

The official, and vague, reason for Janet’s punishment is “violation of Facebook community standards.”

The unofficial, but likely, reason is Janet’s Christian faith.

Again, if you’ve been to Another Porch you know that Janet is a deeply religious person. Her faith is reflected in everything she does, in everything she writes, and posts.

Do you find Christ offensive, Facebook? Sure looks that way.

  • Put up a fight!

If Facebook discriminates against you, because you are a Christian, or a conservative, don’t just leave Facebook. Stand up for yourself, don’t let them bully you.

“Yes, they do! (target Christians, and conservatives) Not surprising at all. But they will NEVER touch what really matters and God is mightier than FB…his Word will never be silenced or ended. Hallelujah!” — Janet Martin

P.S. Even the links Janet posted in a private conversation in her Messenger were deleted. Guess what she linked to? Poems about Advent.

P.S. Janet’s blog has been unblocked, and she can post links to her blog again. Janet, being Janet, wants to think it might have been a glitch, or a faulty algorithm, etc. Maybe so. However, Facebook has repeatedly removed conservative posts from my feed, or pushed them way down so they became almost impossible to find; Facebook deleted my conservative Catholic friend’s opinion post, and the whole comment thread it generated, without any explanation, etc. And the fact that “private” Messenger is censored makes it even harder to trust Facebook. So, I’ll stick to my version of what happened. 

Image: Austrian Master. Crucifixion, c. 1400–1420. Tempera and gold on panel, Overall: 18 3/8 x 11 1/8 in. (46.7 x 28.3 cm). BF828. Public Domain.

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All Saints’ Day

  • A message for the Pope:

“You cannot with a single stroke wipe out all of the sins people in general are committing within the Christian religion, especially within the clerical order, over whom you should be even more watchful. But you certainly can and are obligated to do it, and if you don’t, you would have it on your conscience. …

Do you know what will happen to you if you don’t set things right by doing what you can? God wants you to reform his bride completely; he doesn’t want her to be leprous any longer. If your holiness does not do all you can about this — because God has appointed you and given you such dignity for no other purposes — God will do it himself by using all sorts of troubles.”

Saint Catherine of Siena writing to Pope Urban VI in 1380.

Amen.

Those who should be in the forefront of fighting for the Church and her values — heed the warning.

  • And here’s Saint Catherine’s message for everyone:

“Start being brave about everything. Drive out darkness and spread light. Don’ look at your weaknesses. Realize instead that in Christ crucified you can do everything.”

Never despair. Never give up your faith. Never let your soul slumber.

Image: painting by Fra Angelico, 15th century, public domain

Heroic Crown of Sonnets

 

Christ Carrying the Cross

It started as a prayer, “wrote itself” during April, 2018, and by the end of the month–tragically–dedication presented itself.

It feels like a devotional to me. It has helped me, and I hope it will help others as well.

Never despair. Never give up your faith. Never let your soul slumber.

Alleluia, heroic crown of sonnets, for Alfie Evans

P.S. Several people told me they were not sure it’s okay to share the sonnets without my permission. By all means, you have my permission. Please, give credit to the author, and do share the sonnets. Thank you.

Image: Unidentified artist. Christ Carrying the Cross, c. 1460. Tempera and oil (?) with gold and silver leaf on panel, Overall: 29 3/8 x 51 1/2 in. (74.6 x 130.8 cm). BF396. Public Domain.

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