Let Us Be Thankful

River Scene–Boat and Trees

The leaves are falling off the trees…
Here goes
Another one! Folks bundle up so they won’t freeze…oh,
No! The summer’s gone. Where does the summer spend the fall? Where does it go, you
Know? I miss it
So…the heat and all…but wait! How ‘bout the snow? I love that stuff! It makes me
Grin, when
I look up and let the fluffy flakes fall on my chin, and tongue…no, not just yet — I’ll
Visit, where’s that place you say, where now the summer stays? But
I can’t go till in the snow I’ve played for days and days…
No, I can’t
Go till in the snow I’ve played for days and days!

© 2018 Sasha A. Palmer (a.k.a. Happy)

Image: Ernest Lawson. River Scene–Boat and Trees, c. 1907–1910. Oil on canvas, Overall: 25 1/8 x 30 1/8 in. (63.8 x 76.5 cm). BF484. Public Domain.

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Confucius et al., and Anne R. Allen

On the paralyzing effect of “concrete, defined plans for life,” the glory of change, and the liberating power of play and experimentation.

“The talents and weaknesses we are born with get in the way if we allow them to determine what we can and cannot do. The only thing you really need to be good at is the ability to train yourself to get better.”

— Michael Puett and Christine Gross-Loh (with a nod to Xunzi), from “The College of Chinese Wisdom,” The Wall Street Journal, Review, Sat.–Sun., April 2–3, 2016

“Having fun and letting yourself play can be the key to unlocking that box and freeing your creativity from the beliefs you don’t even realize are keeping you trapped inside.”

— Anne R. Allen, from the post “We are All Prisoners or Our Unexamined Beliefs: Is a False Belief Holding Back Your Writing Career?”

 

 

Join the Club

“Social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook and Goodreads have contributed to a culture in which everyone reads–and tells their friends about–the same handful of books a year. …

As a result, publishers are competing for debut literary talent with the same kind of frenzied auction bidding once reserved for promising debut thrillers or romance novels. …

The need to secure one of the few must-read books of the year has given rise to an elite new club: the million-dollar literary debut.”

–Jennifer Maloney  (‘Betting Big On Literary Newcomers,’ The Wall Street Journal, Arena, Friday, Nov. 20, 2015)