How Big Is Your Personal Library?

Apple Vendor (La Marchande de pommes)

  • Are you guilty of tsundoku?

“We collect, covet, and guard books the way a dragon does jewels. There’s even a word for having too many books: tsundoku.”

Do you buy more books than you can afford and/or more books than your house can accommodate? Do you have more books than you can ever read? Do you like the feel of a real tangible book?..

Read this article on the joy of reading, the love of books, and learning to let go.

  • So, have you bought any new books lately?

Are your bookshelves overstuffed? Can you barely see your house behind the dusty stacks of books you might read one day?

Maybe it’s time for a purge. Alternatively,

“…stop beating yourself up for buying too many books or for having a to-read list that you could never get through in three lifetimes.”

Read this article on why having way too many books is a very good thing.

What say you?

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Apple Vendor (La Marchande de pommes), 1890. Oil on canvas, Overall: 25 9/16 x 21 7/16 in. (65 x 54.5 cm). BF8. Public Domain.

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Do You Strambotto?

Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique)

I stepped outside to see the evening birdsong,
and hear the lilacs fill the air with purple
and white aroma, and to drown before long
in maybe-May. Falling beyond the circle
of probability, defying lifelong
perceptions of what’s real, the twilight sparkled
with myriads of realms. Mind–proven all wrong–
accepted its defeat, joyfully humbled.

 

Prompted by Poetic Asides Strambotto Poetic Form Challenge.

Image: Henri Rousseau. Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique), 1905. Oil on canvas, Overall: 39 3/8 x 31 3/4 in. (100 x 80.6 cm). BF388. Public Domain.

 

Happy May

May, Nino's art

I know…
Still, be that as it may,
I’ll bloom my heart out
come sweet May,
then petal-light
I’ll fall and flow
where all spent hours
and flowers go…

Yet till the end
my fate I’ll tease
while days of May
will past me breeze.

 

© 2016 Sasha A. Palmer

Image: © 2017 Nino Chakvetadze, reproduced with permission.

Can They Edit Jesus out of Easter?

The Resurrection

Jesus Christ is Risen! Alleluia!

  • “What’s in a name?”

No, Ms. Omar, Notre-Dame de Paris is not “art & architecture” — it’s an OUR LADY OF PARIS CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL.

No, Mr. Obama & Mrs. Clinton, the martyrs in Sri Lanka were not “Easter worshipers” — they were CHRISTIANS. They were CATHOLICS. That’s the reason they were murdered.

No, they cannot edit Jesus out of Easter. But they will keep trying. Stay vigilant!

Have a blessed Easter season.

 

Image: Unidentified artist. The Resurrection, Probably second half of the 15th century. Oil on panel, Overall: 39 1/2 x 23 3/4 in. (100.3 x 60.3 cm). BF866. Public Domain.

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

CHURCH FIRE

“Hold the cross high so I may see it through the flames!” — Joan of Arc

Seasoned wood burns well,
fire spreads fast,
roofs collapse, windows fall,
shards of stained glass,
revolutions, wars,
emperors, presidents,
ashes, ashes…
Hundreds of years young
it stands intact.
The same song rises to the spire,
and cloven tongues
as of fire
rest upon us.

 

Have a Blessed Triduum.

Image credit

April Is Not That Cruel After All

Gagra, Nino_n

It is
(Won’t you agree?)
a dream away —
that filled with spring and promise
fun sun day
where we can touch the wind,
and taste the air,
and be the way we were,
without a care,
free to reclaim
what fleeting time can’t steal,
where we can hope once more,
and laugh,
and heal.

© 2014 Sasha A. Palmer

Image: © 2014 Nino Chakvetadze, reproduced with permission.

Happy April!

Is Your Blog in a Rut?

Cup of Chocolate (Femme prenant du chocolat)

  • Does your blog need a little help?

Bryn Donovan, editor, novelist, non-fiction writer, and blogger, shares 25 ideas for blog posts — try them all, or take your pick. Have fun blogging!

  • Are you poeming yet?

National Poetry Month is here. One of the many ways to celebrate April is to take part in the annual April Poem-A-Day Challenge. Catch up!

By the way, posting your poems on your blog throughout April–daily, or almost daily–is bound to give your blog a boost. Ready…Set…Go write poetry!

Happy April!

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Cup of Chocolate (Femme prenant du chocolat), c. 1912. Oil on canvas, Overall: 21 5/16 x 25 5/8 in. (54.1 x 65.1 cm). BF14. Public Domain.

Picture Books, Anyone?

Claude Renoir

  • Do you have a picture book in you?

Erica Verrillo has put together a list of 24 publishers accepting picture books without an agent. Check it out.

  • Picture books aren’t going anywhere.

Except perhaps across borders. A trade publishing house Amazon Publishing has created a new children’s book imprint Amazon Crossing Kids that will focus on children’s picture books in translation.

  • Are you–an adult–into picture books?

You aren’t alone. “Why have we come to a place where picture books are relegated to the landscape only of the very young? It was not always thus.”

Go write one, or read one, enjoy!

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Claude Renoir, c. 1904. Oil on canvas, Overall: 21 5/8 x 18 1/4 in. (55 x 46.3 cm). BF935. Public Domain.

 

Do You Rattle?

Pensive Young Woman (Jeune femme pensive)

Submitting to Rattle is a cinch.  Getting published in this American poetry magazine is not easy. But it’s worth a try.

Do you dream of getting published in Rattle?

  • Follow the weekly critiques Timothy Green (Rattle’s Editor) posts on Facebook.

(Like this one.)

They just might bring you a step closer to the realization of your dream.

Tim’s critiques are respectful, insightful, thought-provoking, and fun.

Watch them live if you can, post questions or comments in the thread. Or catch up later. Submit your own poem for a critique, if you dare.

@RattleMagazine 

Watch, listen, learn, contribute, have fun, keep writing, keep submitting, get published!

Image: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. Pensive Young Woman (Jeune femme pensive), 1855–1860. Oil on panel (later mounted to plywood), Overall: 12 1/2 × 9 5/16 in. (31.8 × 23.7 cm). BF822. Public Domain.