“Two lovers’ union…” (a sonnet)

In Vaudeville: Woman and Man on Stage

Two lovers’ union — stronger than a bond
between a mother and her child. A man
is nothing but a wretched vagabond
till he is whole with his betrothed. What can
persuade a lover, worshiping his love,
to see the presence of another king?
No, neither found inadequacies of
a “perfect” love, nor quarrels, nor the sting
of jealousy that pierces the heart
will cause a man to doubt his love — but time
and time alone will feed its apple tart
to human soul, until—in truth sublime—
a quiet revelation takes the throne:
we’re born alone, and we depart alone.

 

Image: Charles Demuth. In Vaudeville: Woman and Man on Stage, 1917. Watercolor and graphite on wove paper, Overall: 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm). BF601. Public Domain.

Cold Summer (poem in Russian)

У Кирилла и Мефодия

Чёрен, чёрен белый свет,
Стынет лето, правды нет,
Кривда-матушка одна,
Да тюрьма, полным-полна,
Да по шее холодок —
Ропот, окрик, шепоток.
Время покатилось вспять,
Воздух по дворам распят,
И поруган, изгнан вон
Под сусальный перезвон,
Спас растерянный, опалый
Поправляет венчик алый.

 

Image:  © 2019 Vlad Dokshin

To the Girl in the Sunlight (poem in Russian)

Girl in the Sunlight.

Отчего ты печалишься, дальняя
незнакомка знакомая?
Может я, помогу чем-то —
словом, молчанием?
В саду твоём — солнцестояние,
лето вечное, тень резная
фатой подвенечной легла,
ты из света, тепла, руки сложены
так покойно, покорно… Может ты,
мне расскажешь, что видишь-ведаешь,
зачем в глазах грусть?
Незатейлив секрет пусть,
ты его как ларец дорогой открой —
помоги, научи, помолчи со мной.

 

Image: Girl in the Sunlight. Portrait of Maria Simonovich by Valentin Serov. 1888. Oil on canvas. The Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia.

Happy August

Boy and dog, starry night, Nino

I would have said,
no, we could not explain
the physics of the lightning,
or the rain,
stars galloping
across the endless sky…
I would have said,
no, we could not tell why
the world would trade its green
for gold, and fall
onto the earth
we treaded with our small
bare feet of childhood.

No, we surely could
not ever tell.
We simply understood.

 

© 2014 Sasha A. Palmer

Image: © 2015 Nino Chakvetadze, reproduced with permission.