Did Poetry Need Saving?

Portrait of a Man Holding a Watch

  • Are you a poet? Read the following statements:

“A day in the life can consist of all-day writing, touring, or, perhaps unprecedented for a poet, time in the office with her team to oversee operations and manage projects.

Building their own mini brands, poets can harness e-commerce to supplement their income.”

  • Did this make you flinch? Chances are you aren’t a wealthy poet.

Most likely, not a Rupi Kaur’s fan. You probably don’t think that Instagram saved poetry. You might very well doubt that poetry needed saving in the first place.

“But poetry, like any other art, must adapt to the world changing around it.” Must it? Hmm… I wonder.

  • Don’t despair. You are not alone.

“…the man who has often been called the greatest poet of the 20th century struggled to make ends meet. He accepted money from relatives to buy underwear and pajamas, and anxiety over his finances drove him to breakdowns.”

His name is T.S. Eliot.

Just keep writing poetry.

Image: Frans Hals. Portrait of a Man Holding a Watch, 1643. Oil on canvas, Overall: 32 1/2 x 26 1/4 in. (82.6 x 66.7 cm). BF262. Public Domain.

 

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It’s Not about Politics, but…

Never Again, He Remarked Gloomily

  • “The Passive Voice is not a blog about politics.”

It’s not. Still, if you’ve been following TPV for sometime, you’ve noticed that the blog is not entirely apolitical.

As Passive Guy himself admits “the heat of political dialogue in the United States…is almost impossible to avoid.”

  • My blog is about writing.

I started out with an idea that I’d never ever touch the hot topics, such as religion, politics, and the great pumpkin; but I’ve had trouble staying away from them lately.

Writing–like living, feeling, thinking–is inseparable from freedom. And this freedom is under attack.

Faith is under attack.

‘They err who say “the world is turning pagan again.” Would that it were! The truth is that we are falling into a much worse state.’ — C.S. Lewis March, 1953

Our children are not safe.

They are being brainwashed, manipulated.

  • This vicious nonsense is everywhere, including the world of the written word.

So, when I see evil, I’ll post about it. After all, my blog is about writing.

 

Image: William James Glackens. Never Again, He Remarked Gloomily, 1909. Black crayon and white gouache with blue crayon underdrawing on paperboard, Overall: 11 3/8 x 13 5/8 in. (28.9 x 34.6 cm). BF2028. Public Domain.

 

On “Delete” Buttons, November & Daffodils

  • Thinking of deleting your Blogger blog?

Think again. There are at least four reasons why it’s not a good idea.

“The Blogger Help Forum is dotted with people who regret deleting their blogs.”  

Why permanently delete your Blogger blog if there’s a much better alternative?

  • What comes after October?

November Poem-a-Day (PAD) Chapbook Challenge, the annual writing challenge from Writer’s Digest Poetic Asides. Read the guidelines, and get ready.

  • Don’t want to think about autumn?

Think spring instead. And daffodils.

Why Read, Write & Teach Poetry?

Promenade (La Promenade)

“A good poem is a delight to read because it sparks the imagination and elicits a response from the reader–a chuckle, a groan, a sigh, an epiphany. The conciseness of poetry, especially when combined with an engaging rhyme and meter, can make just about any topic memorable.”

Listen to Heidi Roemer–author of many poetry picture books and more than 400 poems published in various children’s magazines–talk about poetry, the importance of reading it, writing it, and teaching it to young children.

Get inspired, and start creating your own “Child’s Garden of Verses.” 

And don’t forget to mix a bit of mystery in. Steer clear of the–often encouraged–“quantifiable process of demystification.”  It’s okay to leave poems unsolved.

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Promenade (La Promenade), c. 1906. Oil on canvas, Overall: 64 3/4 x 50 15/16 in. (164.5 x 129.4 cm). BF571. Public Domain.